Logos Run

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This is the continuation from Runner, and continues the story of the attempt to re-enable the star gates. It has the comicly incompetent Technosociety once again, as well as series of genetically engineered protagonists. I am bothered by why the star gate power supplies cause people to fall ill — you’d think in a highly advanced society capable of building star gates they might have spent some time on shielding. Or did the shielding somehow fail on all the power sources sometime over the thousands of years of decay? The has a disappointing ending, but was a fun read until then. I find it hard to suspend disbelief about how the AIs present themselves, but apart from that the book was solid. This one is probably not as good as the first.

[isbn: 0441015360; 9780441015368]

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Runner

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I bought this book on impulse, and I am glad I did. The book is very Buddhist in its outlook, and characters believe in reincarnation, which makes it ok for people to die. There sure is a lot of that happening in this book, perhaps more so than in Dietz’s combat books. The underlying story is very different from the other Dietz stuff I have read, and very good. The Legion of the Damned books suffer from very one dimensional characterizations of their female characters, whereas this book has a strong female as a leading and fully developed character, which is a nice change. I enjoyed this book.

[isbn: 9780441014095]

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Friday

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This is the first Heinlein book I have read in a long time — since High School in fact. I read this one simply on an impulse, as the back cover description made it sound interesting. Heinlein isn’t on the list of authors that I am pursuing at the moment, although I might consider changing that.

This book covers a more complicated Earth than the one we have right now, although in some ways its more simple. The main character Friday doesn’t ever seem to have trouble making friends, and portions of the book are just a series of her romantic entanglements. Most of the complexities are political. The story is mostly about a journey, both physical as well as emotional, and interestingly there isn’t a consistent opposing force. I suspect that might be unusual, at least for the stuff I read.

This book was good, even if the constant romantic entanglements seemed extraneous.

[award: winner nebula 1982; winner hugo 1982; winner locus 1983; winner prometheus 1983]
[isbn: 034530988x]

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