Artemis

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Its been ages since I’ve read a book in a couple of days, let alone stayed up late when I really shouldn’t in order to finish a book. Artemis is the book which broke me out of that rut — this is a fun, clever, light read. Its quite different when compared to The Martian, but I think that’s good. Weir has attempted to do something new instead of just playing on his previous successes.

An excellent book, and Mr Weir is solidly landing on my buy-everything-he-writes list.

Artemis Book Cover Artemis
Andy Weir
Fiction
Del Rey
November 13, 2017
384

She grew up on the moon, of course she has a dark side... Jazz Bashara is a criminal. Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you're not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you've got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent. Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of Jazz's problems, as she learns that she's stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself - and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even more unlikely than the first.

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Turmoil

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A very readable set of essays from Robyn Williams, the broadcaster of the Australian Science Show, not the comedian. Covering the state of modern science, journalism, the ABC, and whether modern democracy is doomed in an approachable and very readable form. I enjoyed this book greatly. A good Sunday morning and vacation read if you’re into approachable non-fiction.

Turmoil Book Cover Turmoil
Robyn Williams
Memoir
Newsouth Press

Robyn Williams, presenter of The Science Show on ABC Radio, reveals all in Turmoil, a searingly honest and often blackly funny reflection on his life, friends, the people he loves and loathes, and a multi-faceted career that includes over forty years on radio. Robyn writes frankly about everything, from performing with Monty Python, his impressions of fellow scientists Richard Dawkins and David Attenborough, and his unique insights on climate change and the recent devaluing of science, to frugality and being treated for bowel cancer.

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Scared Weird Frozen Guy

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The true life story of a kid from Bribie Island (I’ve been there!) running a marathon in Antartica, via being a touring musical comedian, doing things like this:

This book is an interesting and light read, and came kindly recommended by Michael Carden, who pretty much insisted I take the book off him at a cafe. I don’t regret reading it and would recommend it to people looking for a light autobiography for a rainy (and perhaps cold) evening or two.

Oh, and the Scared Weird Little Guys of course are responsible for this gem…

This book is highly recommended and now I really want to go for a run.

Scared Weird Frozen Guy Book Cover Scared Weird Frozen Guy
Rusty Berther
Comedians
2012
325

After 20 incredible years as part of a musical comedy duo, Scared Weird Little Guy, Rusty Berther found himself running a marathon in Antarctica. What drove him to this? In this hilarious and honest account of his life as a Scared Weird Little Guy, and his long journey attempting an extreme physical and mental challenge at the bottom of the world, Rusty examines where he started from, and where he just might be going to.

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Head On

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A sequel to Lock In, this book is a quick and fun read of a murder mystery. It has Scalzi’s distinctive style which has generally meshed quite well for me, so it’s not surprise that I enjoyed this book.

 

Head On Book Cover Head On
John Scalzi
Fiction
Tor Books
April 19, 2018
336

To some left with nothing, winning becomes everything In a post-virus world, a daring sport is taking the US by storm. It's frenetic, violent and involves teams attacking one another with swords and hammers. The aim: to obtain your opponent's head and carry it through the goalposts. Impossible? Not if the players have Hayden's Syndrome. Unable to move, Hayden's sufferers use robot bodies, which they operate mentally. So in this sport anything goes, no one gets hurt - and crowds and competitors love it. Until a star athlete drops dead on the playing field. But is it an accident? FBI agents Chris Shane and Leslie Vann are determined to find out. In this game, fortunes can be made - or lost. And both players and owners will do whatever it takes to win, on and off the field.John Scalzi returns with Head On, a chilling near-future SF with the thrills of a gritty cop procedural. Head On brings Scalzi's trademark snappy dialogue and technological speculation to the future world of sports.

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Caliban’s War

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This is the second book in the Leviathan Wakes series by James SA Corey. Just as good as the first, this is a story about how much a father loves his daughter, moral choices, and politics — just as much as it is the continuation of the story arc around the alien visitor. I haven’t seen this far in the Netflix series, but I sure hope they get this right, because its a very good story so far.

Caliban's War Book Cover Caliban's War
James S. A. Corey
Fiction
Orbit Books
April 30, 2013
624

For someone who didn't intend to wreck the solar system's fragile balance of power, Jim Holden did a pretty good job of it. While Earth and Mars have stopped shooting each other, the core alliance is shattered. The outer planets and the Belt are uncertain in their new - possibly temporary - autonomy. Then, on one of Jupiter's moons, a single super-soldier attacks, slaughtering soldiers of Earth and Mars indiscriminately and reigniting the war. The race is on to discover whether this is the vanguard of an alien army, or if the danger lies closer to home.

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Hugo nominees for 2018

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Lifehacker kindly pointed out that the Hugo nominees are out for 2018. They are:

  • The Collapsing Empire, by John Scalzi. I’ve read this one and liked it.
  • New York 2140, by Kim Stanley Robinson. I’ve had a difficult time with Kim’s work in the past, but perhaps I’ll one day read this.
  • Provenance, by Ann Leckie. I liked Ancillary Justice, but failed to fully read the sequel, so I guess we’ll wait and see on this one.
  • Raven Stratagem, by Yoon Ha Lee. I know nothing!
  • Six Wakes, by Mur Lafferty. Again, I know nothing about this book or this author.

So a few there to consider in the future.

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The Collapsing Empire

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This is a fun fast read, as is everything by Mr Scalzi. The basic premise here is that of a set of interdependent colonies that are about to lose their ability to trade with each other, and are therefore doomed. Oh, except they don’t know that and are busy having petty trade wars instead. It isn’t a super intellectual read, but it is fun and does leave me wanting to know what happens to the empire…

The Collapsing Empire Book Cover The Collapsing Empire
John Scalzi
Fiction
Tor Books
March 21, 2017
336

Our universe is ruled by physics and faster than light travel is not possible—until the discovery of The Flow, an extra-dimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transport us to other worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It’s a hedge against interstellar war—and a system of control for the rulers of the empire. The Flow is eternal—but it is not static. Just as a river changes course, The Flow changes as well, cutting off worlds from the rest of humanity. When it’s discovered that The Flow is moving, possibly cutting off all human worlds from faster than light travel forever, three individuals -- a scientist, a starship captain and the Empress of the Interdependency—are in a race against time to discover what, if anything, can be salvaged from an interstellar empire on the brink of collapse. “John Scalzi is the most entertaining, accessible writer working in SF today.” —Joe Hill "If anyone stands at the core of the American science fiction tradition at the moment, it is Scalzi." —The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Third Edition

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Gods of Metal

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In this follow-up to Command and Control, Schlosser explores the conscientious objectors and protestors who have sought to highlight not just the immorality of nuclear weapons, but the hilariously insecure state the US government stores them in. In all seriousness, we are talking grannies with heart conditions being able to break in.

My only real objection to this book is that is more of a pamphlet than a book, and feels a bit like things that didn’t make it into the main book. That said, it is well worth the read.

Gods of Metal Book Cover Gods of Metal
Eric Schlosser
August 6, 2015
128

'Sitting not far below my feet, there was a thermonuclear warhead about twenty times more powerful than the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, all set and ready to go. The only sound was the sound of the wind.' Seventy years after the bombing of Hiroshima, Eric Schlosser's powerful, chilling piece of journalism exposes today's deadly nuclear age. Originally published in the New Yorkerand now expanded, this terrifying true account of the 2012 break-in at a high-security weapons complex in Tennessee is a masterly work of reportage. 'So incontrovertibly right and so damnably readable.' Financial Times

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A Walk in the Woods

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I found this tale of Bill Bryson walking the Appalachian Trail (rather incompetently I must say) immensely entertaining. Well written, interesting, generally exaggerated, and leaving me with a desire to get out somewhere and walk some more. I’d strongly recommend this book to people who already care about bush walking, but have found other pursuits to occupy most of their spare time.

A Walk in the Woods Book Cover A Walk in the Woods
Bill Bryson
Sports & Recreation
Anchor
2007
397

Traces the author's adventurous trek along the Appalachian Trail past its natural pleasures, human eccentrics, and offbeat comforts.

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Leviathan Wakes

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I read this book based on the recommendation of Richard Jones, and its really really good. A little sci-fi, a little film noir, and very engaging. I also like that bad things happen to good people in the story — its gritty and unclean enough to be believable.

I don’t want to ruin the book for anyone, but I really enjoyed this and have already ordered the sequels. Oh, and there’s a Netflix series based off these books that I’ll now have to watch too.

Leviathan Wakes Book Cover Leviathan Wakes
James S.A. Corey
Fiction
Orbit
June 15, 2011
592

The book is the basis for the first season of The Expanse, a new original series premiering on Syfy in December 2015. Leviathan Wakes is James S. A. Corey's first novel in the epic series the Expanse, a modern masterwork of science fiction where humanity has colonized the solar system. Two hundred years after migrating into space, mankind is in turmoil. When a reluctant ship's captain and washed-up detective find themselves involved in the case of a missing girl, what they discover brings our solar system to the brink of civil war, and exposes the greatest conspiracy in human history.

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