The Greenbrier bunker opens for tours!

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A while ago I was watching a documentary about the bunker under the Greenbrier resort. The Greenbrier is one of those swanky resorts close enough to Washington DC to be in easy reach for the powerful people who hang out there. That’s why it was chosen as the location for the bunker that Congress would hang out at come the apocalypse. The bunker was built in secret, and the documentary mentioned cool bits like they had to move so much earth that an extra golf course was built with the rubble in order to disguise it’s source.

This sums it up pretty well:

It was built at the suggestion of then-President Dwight D. Eisenhower as a way of preserving the balance of power among the three branches of the U.S. government in the event of nuclear war. But now, the Government Relocation Center, located under the luxurious Greenbrier resort in the mountains of West Virginia, is a unique and eerie tourist attraction, a monument to a nation’s Cold War fears.

That’s from a CNN article on the topic. In fact,

there is
no shortage
of content
about the bunker.

Anyways, back to my excitement… The bunker is now open for tours! I will so be going there if I ever end up near West Virginia. I guess that makes this post a follow up to my one noting I should visit the Essex bunker if I ever get the chance.

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Computers, why do I trust you?

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Hmmmm. My laptop hard disk was dead when I woke up this morning. It gives a bunch of ATA read errors which don’t look very good at all. Luckily for me, the help desk at works. A USB hard disk caddy I happened to have spare, their USB cabling, a spare Thinkpad X41, and a couple of hours of data rescue, and I don’t think I have lost anything. All I can say is thank god for work’s help desk. They rock.

Part of the excitement with the failure is that I fly to Phoenix again tomorrow, and wasn’t looking forward to life without a computer. Oh, and I promise to do more backups (although all the stuff I really care about is in source control anyways).

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Solutions for the pollution of a social network?

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LinkedIn is a social network for professionals. It’s all about who you know, and who you have worked with. The basic idea seems to be that recording all that information will result in new business opportunities, as well as referrals to jobs et cetera. When someone who claims to have worked for your company joins LinkedIn, you get email asking you if you know them.

So, what do you do when you look in the company address book, and it’s quite clear that they don’t work for your company? There doesn’t seem to be any way in the UI to point out that someone is lying. How annoying.

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I got MythBurn working!

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It took a few hours, but I have MythBurn (a web interface for creating DVDs with MythTV) finally working. The problem was that the mjpegtools shipped with Ubuntu Dapper crashes with an invalid free(). Compiling from source fixed that.

Update: I might have lied. I now have troubles getting Xine to playback the DVD when I mount the ISO image through a loop back. I don’t have any DVD media handy, so I will have to wait a couple of days until I can do more testing. The symptom I see is that the intro MythTV screen plays, and then Xine freezes before displaying the menu.

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I-94s at the airport

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Andrew is having some pain with his I-94, I suspect the first problem is that he flew United who are self admitted cunters. Secondly, you’re meant to hand in the I-94 at boarding not check in (or at least that’s my experience). All is not lost though, apparently you’re meant to mail the I-94 back to them, although that wont be processed in time for your return to the US.

Update: my brother assures me that it’s no big deal to mail the I-94 in, even if you’re returning quickly to the US, as they’re not processed in real time at the airport either. So, perhaps the delay isn’t a problem…

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