How to consume all your bandwidth in one easy step

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When I restart Mozilla Firefox, it loads all the tabs I had loaded before (did you know you can set your homepage to a set of tabs, not just one page? How do I get Mozilla to auto-magically remember which tabs I had opened last time?). For the G’Day world pod-cast, I get:

    Bandwidth Limit Exceeded

    The server is temporarily unable to service your request due to the site owner reaching his/her bandwidth limit. Please try again later.

So I guess the way to use up all your bandwidth is to start a pod-cast. Heh.

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scp oddness for the day

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-C (compress data stream) and -l (limit bandwidth used) conflict with each other? How? Well, I was copying a very compressible file, in fact, I was transferring 200 k-bytes per second on a link capable of 25 k-bytes per second when I noticed this. scp is using the actual delta on disc as the metric for bandwidth used, so when I ask for it to limit the bandwidth, it gets real confused by the 200 k-byte speed, and ends up tapering to a tenth of the request bandwidth.

Interesting.

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Going quiet for a little while

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So, with rather good timing, my RSI has started acting up again. I suspect it has something to do with spending two solid days typing XML comments into C# code — those angle brackets are a killer. Anyways, luckily it’s the holiday season, so I don’t have to be back in the office until Thursday next week. That will give my anti-inflamatories (something called Mobic) time to kick in. They’ve previously been very good, so I have hopes for them this time too.

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Silly question for the day

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If people are concerned about the amount of bandwidth that is being used by RSS feeds being downloaded every hour or whatever to check for changes, then why doesn’t the next version of the RSS specification just implement a “ask me again in x minutes” field? I’ve read the RSS spec a while ago, and I don’t remember anything like that being there, although I might just be senile (I haven’t checked that it really isn’t there before writing this).

It just strikes me as silly that my aggregator pulls updates for every feed every 90 minutes (that’s what I configured it to) when some feeds clearly change every 10 minutes, all day (think news sites), some feeds update a lot during business hours (think of those corporate bloggers out there — even I don’t tend to write much when I’m asleep), and other sites only update every couple of days. Surely the only person who knows how often they’re likely to update their blog is the person writing it? Also, it would mean that people who are concerned about bandwidth usage, but do update often (like Robert Scoble) could just implement some form of tapering by telling people to not download a new copy of the XML file every 12 nanoseconds.

Then we could wait a couple of years. And then punish the aggregators who don’t respect our wishes like Slashdot does now.

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Self-referential back slapping

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In the vein of the self-referential, and self-congratulatory tone that some bloggers seem to feel is the mark of status for us online diarizers, I apologize to Steven for misinterpreting the gist of his post. By the way, is anyone else rubbed the wrong way by the implication that having an online diary will somehow solve world hunger?

Sure, it’s nice to know what people are doing. Sure, it’s kinda cool. However, a lot of people seem to spend a lot of time just discussing the discussion with each other. Lots of people have had online diaries going back a long way after all, well before blogging was an interesting term. This diary has posts going back to 2000 after all.

The most useful thing I’ve found with blogging? It creates a huge database on Google available content (it’s the technical stuff I care about there, but I imagine there are lots of other forms of content as well out there). Now, that’s something which makes the world a better place. That’s why I keep an online diary by the way — so I can find things I learnt two years ago again when I need them.

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It’s a bloody penguin!

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Just heard that through my open front door. It seems that some people take a little while to work out what Christmas lights are all about. I didn’t have enough time / inspiration to decide what to make this year, so I’m just running with last years. I’m thinking of perhaps something USB controlled next year, as I had difficulties working out how to solve some control problems until I happened upon a copy of the excellent USB Complete. If you care about how USB works (including high speed 2.0) I recommend it.

Perhaps something a little more vendor neutral is in order next year? Or perhaps not. It depends on if Microsoft has stomped on Mono by then…

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