city2surf 2018 wrap up

city2surf 2018 was yesterday, so how did the race go? First off, thanks to everyone who helped out with my fund raising for the Black Dog Institute — you raised nearly $2,000 AUD for this important charity, which is very impressive. Thanks for everyone’s support!

city2surf is 14kms, with 166 meters of vertical elevation gain. For the second year running I was in the green start group, which is for people who have previously finished the event in less than 90 minutes. There is one start group before this, red, which is for people who can finish in less than 70 minutes. In reality I think its unlikely that I’ll ever make it to red — it would require me to shave about 30 seconds per kilometre off my time to just scrape in, and I think that would be hard to do.

Training for city2surf last year I tore my right achilles, so I was pretty much starting from scratch for this years event — at the start of the year I could run about 50 meters before I had issues. Luckily I was referred to an excellent physiotherapist who has helped me build back up safely — I highly recommend Cameron at Southside Physio Therapy if you live in Canberra.

Overall I ran a lot in training for this year — a total of 540 kilometres. I was also a lot more consistent than in previous years, which is something I’m pretty proud of given how cold winters are in Canberra. Cold weather, short days, and getting sick seem to always get in the way of winter training for me.

On the day I was worried about being cold while running, but that wasn’t an issue. It was about 10 degrees when we started and maybe a couple of degrees warmer than that at the end. The maximum for the day was only 16, which is cold for Sydney at this time of year. There was a tiny bit of spitting rain, but nothing serious. Wind was the real issue — it was very windy at the finish, and I think if it had been like that for the entire race it would have been much less fun.

That said, I finished in 76:32, which is about three minutes faster than last year and a personal best. Overall, an excellent experience and I’ll be back again.

The last week for linux.conf.au 2019 proposals!

Dear humans of the Internet — there is ONE WEEK LEFT to propose talks for linux.conf.au 2019. LCA is one of the world’s best open source conferences, and we’d love to hear you speak!
 
Unsure what to propose? Not sure if your talk is what the conference would normally take? Just want a chat? You’re welcome to reach out to papers-chair@linux.org.au to talk things through.
 

Rejected talk proposal: Design at scale: OpenStack versus Kubernetes

This proposal was submitted for pyconau 2018. It wasn’t accepted, but given I’d put the effort into writing up the proposal I’ll post it here in case its useful some other time. The oblique references to OpensStack are because pycon had an “anonymous” review system in 2018, and I was avoiding saying things which directly identified me as the author.


OpenStack and Kubernetes solve very similar problems. Yet they approach those problems in very different ways. What can we learn from the different approaches taken? The differences aren’t just technical though, there are some interesting social differences too. Continue reading Rejected talk proposal: Design at scale: OpenStack versus Kubernetes

Accepted talk proposal: Learning from the mistakes that even big projects make

This proposal was submitted for pyconau 2018. It was accepted, but hasn’t been presented yet. The oblique references to OpensStack are because pycon had an “anonymous” review system in 2018, and I was avoiding saying things which directly identified me as the author.


Since 2011, I’ve worked on a large Open Source project in python. It kind of got out of hand – 1000s of developers and millions of lines of code. Yet despite being well resourced, we made the same mistakes that those tiny scripts you whip up to solve a small problem make. Come learn from our fail.

Continue reading Accepted talk proposal: Learning from the mistakes that even big projects make

Mirroring all your repos from github

So let me be clear here, I don’t think its a bad thing that Microsoft bought github. No one is forcing you to use their services, in fact they make it trivial to stop using them. So what’s the big deal.

I’ve posted about a few git mirror scripts I run at home recently: one to mirror gerrit repos; and one to mirror arbitrary github users.

It was therefore trivial to whip up a slightly nicer script intended to help you forklift your repos out of github if you’re truly concerned. Its posted on github now (irony intended).

Now you can just do something like:

$ pip install -U -r requirements.txt
$ python download.py --github_token=foo --username=mikalstill

I intend to add support for auto-creating and importing gitlab repos into the script, but haven’t gotten around to that yet. Pull requests welcome.

Quick note: pre-pulling docker images for ONAP OOM installs

Writing this down here because it took me a while to figure out for myself…

ONAP OOM deploys ONAP using Kubernetes, which effectively means Docker images at the moment. It needs to fetch a lot of Docker images, so there is a convenient script provided to pre-pull those images to make install faster and more reliable.

The script in the OOM codebase isn’t very flexible, so Jira issue OOM-655 was filed for a better script. The script was covered in code review 30169. Disappointingly, the code reviewer there doesn’t seem to have actually read the jira issue or the code before abandoning the patch — which isn’t very impressive.

So how do you get the nicer pre-pull script?

Its actually not too hard once you know the review ID. Just do this inside your OOM git clone:

$ git review -d 30169

You might be prompted for your gerrit details because the ONAP gerrit requires login. Once git review has run, you’ll be left sitting in a branch from when the review was uploaded that includes the script:

$ git branch
  master
* review/james_forsyth/30169

Now just rebase that to bring it in mine with master and get on with your life:

$ git rebase -i origin
Successfully rebased and updated refs/heads/review/james_forsyth/30169.

You’re welcome. I’d like to see the ONAP community take code reviews a bit more seriously, but ONAP seems super corporate (even compared to OpenStack), so I’m not surprised that they haven’t done a very good job here.

How to maintain a local mirror of github repositories

Similarly to yesterday’s post about mirroring ONAP’s git, I also want to mirror all of the git repositories for certain github projects. In this specific case, all of the Kubernetes repositories.

So once again, here is a script based on something Tony Breeds and I cooked up a long time ago for OpenStack…

Continue reading How to maintain a local mirror of github repositories

How to maintain a local mirror of ONAP’s git repositories

For various reasons, I like to maintain a local mirror of git repositories I use a lot, in this case ONAP. This is mostly because of the generally poor network connectivity in Australia, but its also because it makes cloning a new repository super fast.

Tony Breeds and I baked up a script to do this for OpenStack repositories a while ago. I therefore present a version of that mirror script which does the right thing for ONAP projects.

Continue reading How to maintain a local mirror of ONAP’s git repositories

Head On

A sequel to Lock In, this book is a quick and fun read of a murder mystery. It has Scalzi’s distinctive style which has generally meshed quite well for me, so it’s not surprise that I enjoyed this book.

 

Head On Book Cover Head On
John Scalzi
Fiction
Tor Books
April 19, 2018
336

To some left with nothing, winning becomes everything In a post-virus world, a daring sport is taking the US by storm. It's frenetic, violent and involves teams attacking one another with swords and hammers. The aim: to obtain your opponent's head and carry it through the goalposts. Impossible? Not if the players have Hayden's Syndrome. Unable to move, Hayden's sufferers use robot bodies, which they operate mentally. So in this sport anything goes, no one gets hurt - and crowds and competitors love it. Until a star athlete drops dead on the playing field. But is it an accident? FBI agents Chris Shane and Leslie Vann are determined to find out. In this game, fortunes can be made - or lost. And both players and owners will do whatever it takes to win, on and off the field.John Scalzi returns with Head On, a chilling near-future SF with the thrills of a gritty cop procedural. Head On brings Scalzi's trademark snappy dialogue and technological speculation to the future world of sports.