Open Source video creation

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For the upcoming MythNetTV release I am toying with the idea of asking the user if its ok to include a default subscription to an announcement video blog. This blog could be used to inform MythNetTV users of things like new releases, and important bug fixes if such things happen.

This raises the question — if I wanted to mix creative commons licensed music with some still images (the announcements), what tool is the best to do that? Specifically open source tools please.

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MythTV talk at Google

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I’m giving a MythTV talk at Google in the next week (although I can’t find it on the events calendar at the moment, I’ll update this post when I do) so I’ve been playing with MythTV 0.21 a little more than I have in the past. Its pretty cool.

I’m still writing the talk, so I don’t know 100% what it will cover, but I’m thinking it would be good to include some of the stuff from 0.21 as a teaser. Storage groups, the flash player in MythWeb, and the tweaks to the theme system seem like good things to include. Does anyone have other things they think are really cool in 0.21?

Oh, and I’ll have to cover guide data for the US, so it might be time to catch up with my MythTV email backlog once again.

Hopefully in you live near Silicon Valley you can come along to the talk and we can chat afterwards.

Update: I found a Google blog post with the details. To quote the most important information:

Like all sessions of the Open Source Developers @ Google Speaker Series, Michael’s presentation will be open to the public. Doors open at 6:30 PM at our Mountain View campus; guests should plan to sign in at Building 43 reception upon arrival. Refreshments will be served and all are welcome and encouraged to attend. Michael’s presentation will also be taped and published along with all of the public Google Tech Talks.

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Open Source document management from Alfresco

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An Alfresco employee (Alfrescoer?) posts about some of the interesting things they’ve learnt about being an open source company along the way. The comments about PR being more effective the cold sales calls is especially interesting. I argued for years at TOWER that we should be paying more attention to people searching for our product, instead of paying pretty boys to drive sports cars to sales presentations that everyone secretly hates. If your product has a good reputation and people can find it online, surely the customers will come to you?

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Thoughts on the first day of the MySQL user’s conference

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So, I attended the first day of the MySQL user’s conference yesterday, which was the tutorial day. Overall I was fairly impressed. Registration was easy, the actual rooms presentations are given in are comfortable, the PA system seemed to work after some initial problems in the morning tutorial I attended.

The conference center seems to be big on retirees hanging around, which I thought was weird. Each room comes with a little old lady, whose job appears to be to read a fiction novel at the door. I really have no idea what else they were achieving. They seemed to be having fun though. I did find it a bit odd that the only drinks provided by the catering staff during the day were acidic, and most of them caffinated. For example, we had choices between coffee, tea, soda water, coke, diet coke, pepsi and diet pepsi. Some fruit juice or even plain water would have been a nice change by the end of the day.

The food was good, unless you’re a vegan like Stewart at which time the catering staff looked confused and had to go off and get him something special (which didn’t look all that special to me when it came ten minutes later). If that happens again today, then I might try to talk him into just going to a restaurant for lunch with me.

The first tutorial I attended was about MySQL cluster, and to be honest I kinda lost interest at the point where I found out that the database currently has to store all of it’s data in RAM. That basically renders it unusable for anyone with a large-ish database. The speaker did a good job in adverse circumstances such as the PA system initially not working, and trying to speak in a language which is not his native tongue in a room which was very wide. I do think that he needed to clamp down harder on the irrelevant, repetitive and self serving questions though. It seemed to me that there were a fair few people in the room who viewed the conference as their chance to get someone else to fix their problems at work. Whilst it’s fair to go to a conference to ask advice on problems you’re having, I do think that some research prior to attending (or even using the wireless during the conference) is a good idea, and that you shouldn’t interrupt the flow of a talk to ask your tangential questions.

The second tutorial was by a Yahoo, and was on MySQL replication. It was excellent — well prepared, relevant to what I am caring about at the moment, coherent, and flowed well. Jeremy and Eric did a great job (slides from the talk). I hung around at the end to try to offer them beer, but they were swamped by fans who didn’t appear to want to leave. I’ll have to chase them down today sometime to make the offer.

Overall, not a perfect start to the conference, but I thought the day was very useful. A good first day.

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Thoughts on the first day of the MySQL user’s conference

Share

So, I attended the first day of the MySQL user’s conference yesterday, which was the tutorial day. Overall I was fairly impressed. Registration was easy, the actual rooms presentations are given in are comfortable, the PA system seemed to work after some initial problems in the morning tutorial I attended.

The conference center seems to be big on retirees hanging around, which I thought was weird. Each room comes with a little old lady, whose job appears to be to read a fiction novel at the door. I really have no idea what else they were achieving. They seemed to be having fun though. I did find it a bit odd that the only drinks provided by the catering staff during the day were acidic, and most of them caffinated. For example, we had choices between coffee, tea, soda water, coke, diet coke, pepsi and diet pepsi. Some fruit juice or even plain water would have been a nice change by the end of the day.

The food was good, unless you’re a vegan like Stewart at which time the catering staff looked confused and had to go off and get him something special (which didn’t look all that special to me when it came ten minutes later). If that happens again today, then I might try to talk him into just going to a restaurant for lunch with me.

The first tutorial I attended was about MySQL cluster, and to be honest I kinda lost interest at the point where I found out that the database currently has to store all of it’s data in RAM. That basically renders it unusable for anyone with a large-ish database. The speaker did a good job in adverse circumstances such as the PA system initially not working, and trying to speak in a language which is not his native tongue in a room which was very wide. I do think that he needed to clamp down harder on the irrelevant, repetitive and self serving questions though. It seemed to me that there were a fair few people in the room who viewed the conference as their chance to get someone else to fix their problems at work. Whilst it’s fair to go to a conference to ask advice on problems you’re having, I do think that some research prior to attending (or even using the wireless during the conference) is a good idea, and that you shouldn’t interrupt the flow of a talk to ask your tangential questions.

The second tutorial was by a Yahoo, and was on MySQL replication. It was excellent — well prepared, relevant to what I am caring about at the moment, coherent, and flowed well. Jeremy and Eric did a great job (slides from the talk). I hung around at the end to try to offer them beer, but they were swamped by fans who didn’t appear to want to leave. I’ll have to chase them down today sometime to make the offer.

Overall, not a perfect start to the conference, but I thought the day was very useful. A good first day.

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