Mirror traffic during the last day of LCA 2007

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It seems obvious to me that videos of LCA 2007 are good. Specifically:

 IPTraf
 # Statistics for eth0 ##########################################################
 #                                                                              #
 #               Total      Total    Incoming   Incoming    Outgoing   Outgoing #
 #             Packets      Bytes     Packets      Bytes     Packets      Bytes #
 # Total:       241091    228940K       96646   18025370      144445    210915K #
 # IP:          241091    225548K       96646   16655328      144445    208892K #
 # TCP:         241086    225547K       96643   16655034      144443    208892K #
 # UDP:              4        412           2        266           2        146 #
 # ICMP:             0          0           0          0           0          0 #
 # Other IP:         1         28           1         28           0          0 #
 # Non-IP:           0          0           0          0           0          0 #
 #                                                                              #
 #                                                                              #
 # Total rates:      49188.4 kbits/sec        Broadcast packets:            0   #
 #                    6592.2 packets/sec      Broadcast bytes:              0   #
 #                                                                              #
 # Incoming rates:    3814.2 kbits/sec                                          #
 #                    2714.4 packets/sec                                        #
 #                                            IP checksum errors:           0   #
 # Outgoing rates:   45374.2 kbits/sec                                          #
 #                    3877.8 packets/sec                                        #
 # Elapsed time:   0:00 #########################################################
  X-exit

Yay for LCA 2007 videos.

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Video4Linux 2 webcam applications?

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Hi, I’ve spent some time poking around for a video4linux 2 webcam application which doesn’t suck. All I want is something very simple — grab a frame from the specified camera and dump it to a file on disk in a format I can use. I don’t want a config file. I don’t want a web server. I don’t want it to scp the file somewhere. Just grab a frame.

I can’t find such a thing. I have some code myself which nearly does the job, but it’s video4linux 1 and needs a rewrite. Should I just give in a write the code myself?

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Slashdot, Google and Slack

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Rodney Gedda’s writeup of my talk on Slack (which by the way is in no way a comment on Slackware, or derived from Slackware) got slashdotted today. I am assured by Alan that the download link stayed up just fine, despite benley’s best efforts. To be honest, I wasn’t expecting this level of attention, although the tool is very cool.

Other press coverage (that I am aware of) for my AUUG talks includes:

Obviously many of these articles recycle content, and the links above still include the Google News redirects, because it’s easier than editting them out by hand.

(I have been slashdotted before, for TwinkleTux, and another time with the review for the ImageMagick book. Then there was the time that one of my articles about ImageMagick got slashdotted (direct link), but for some reason the sequel didn’t.)

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Slugging away

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I’ve been sitting on a Linksys NSLU2 for a few weeks until I time to hack at it. That time came today. The NSLU2 (called a slug) is a Linksys NAS device, which runs Linux natively. There are two USB 2.0 ports, and a wired ethernet port. The CPU runs at 133MHz normally, but that can be bumped up to 266MHz by removing a resistor from the board. Thanks for the NSLU2 Linux project you can also run your own distro on them, and do cool random things. Oh, and they’re cheap at about $60 to $90 US.

So, let’s talk about the install of Debian on this thing. First off, you need to use the Linksys user interface to configure the network settings. I recommend a static IP, because otherwise it’s going to use DHCP, which will make it hard to find later…

There is a Debian installer option, which uploads firmware via the Linksys web interface, and then you run through the installation with ssh. That’s a great idea, and I would be much more keen on it if it had worked. I gave it a couple of tries, and then declared it not working.

Instead, I went for the DebianSlug image, which isn’t as Debiany as the Debian installer option. Think ipkg instead of dpkg. You need to grab the firmware image, and a program called upslug2, for which you can find a source download at SourceForge. Do the normal source building thing with upslug2.

Next, you need to grow another arm, and try the magical reset sequence, which is documented under the heading “Flashing the image” on this page. Then, run upslug like this:

    $ sudo ./upslug2 -i path to firmware image from before
    Password:
    LKG7D1E09 00:0f:66:7d:1e:09 Product ID: 1 Protocol ID:0 Firmware Version: R23V63 [0x2363]
    Upgrading LKG7D1E09 00:0f:66:7d:1e:09
        . original flash contents  * packet timed out
        ! being erased             - erased
        u being upgraded           U upgraded
        v being verified           V verified
    
      Display:
        <status> <address completed>+<bytes transmitted but not completed>
      Status:
        * timeout occured          + sequence error detected
    
       7983f+000000 ...u------------------------------------------------------------
    

This takes a while. Be patient, it probably hasn’t crashed. Probably.

The slug will reboot, and now you can ssh into it to play. Use the username root, and the password opeNSLUg. At this point it’s a useful computer, and you can keep it like this if you don’t mind using ipkg for everything and dealing with the rather limited set of packages available. If you need pointers on where to go from here, then I recommend you try a turnup help on the command line, and play with ipkg update and it
s friends ipkg list and ipkg install. There are more instructions here if you want them.

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Belkin UPS

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Three of the last four weekends I have woken to the house having been reset by a power failure at about 7am. Last weekend, Catherine was so annoyed she rang the local power company, who claimed that a squirrel had fried itself in the power lines. Finally fed up, I have purchased the cheapest UPS I could find which seemed to be up to my power requirements. It’s the $40 USD Belkin 200 watt 375VA UPS. It’s a USB device for the purpose of managing shutdown, and there doesn’t appear to be a linux driver. The USB device identifier is “050d:0375 Belkin Components” and I’ll keep you posted if I find a driver.

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