OpenStack at linux.conf.au 2013

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As some of you might know, I’m the Director for linux.conf.au 2013. I’ve tried really hard to not use my powers for evil and make the entire conference about OpenStack — in fact I haven’t pulled rank and demanded that specific content be included at all. However, the level of interest in OpenStack has grown so much since LCA 2012 that there is now a significant amount of OpenStack content in the conference without me having to do any of that.

I thought I’d take a second to highlight some of the OpenStack content that I think is particularly interesting — these are the talks I’ll be going to if I have the time (which remains to be seen):

Monday

  • Cloud Infrastructure, Distributed Storage and High Availability Miniconf: while not specifically about OpenStack, this miniconf is going to be a good warm up for all things IaaS at the conference. Here’s a list of the talks for that miniconf:
      Delivering IaaS with Apache CloudStack – Joe Brockmeier

    • oVirt – Dan Macpherson
    • Aeolus – Dan Macpherson
    • Ops: From bare metal to cloud space – Phil Ingram
    • VMs on VLANs on Bridges on Bonds on many NICs – Kim Hawtin
    • OpenStack Swift Overview – John Dickinson
    • JORN and the rise and fall of clustering – Jamie Birse
    • MongoDB Replication & Replica Sets – Stephen Steneker
    • MariaDB Galera Cluster – Grant Allen
    • The Grand Distributed Storage Debate: GlusterFS and Ceph going head to head – Florian Haas, Sage Weil, Jeff Darcy

Tuesday

  • The OpenStack Miniconf: this is a mostly-clear winner for Tuesday. Tristan Goode has been doing a fantastic job of organizing this miniconf, which might not be obvious to people who haven’t been talking to him a couple of times a week about its progress like me. I think people will be impressed with the program, which includes:
    • Welcome and Introduction – Tristan Goode
    • Introduction to OpenStack – Joshua McKenty
    • Demonstration – Sina Sadeghi
    • NeCTAR Research Cloud: OpenStack in Production – Tom Fifeld
    • Bare metal provisioning with OpenStack – Devananda van der Veen
    • Intro to Swift for New Contributors – John Dickinson
    • All-around OpenStack storage with Ceph – Florian Haas
    • Writing API extensions for Nova – Christopher Yeoh
    • The OpenStack Metering Project – Angus Salkeld
    • Lightweight PaaS on the NCI OpenStack Cloud – Kevin Pulo
    • Enabling Compute Clusters atop OpenStack – Enis Afgan
    • Shared Panel with Open Government
  • The Open Government Miniconf: this is the other OpenStack relevant miniconf on Tuesday. This might seem like a bit of a stretch, but as best as I can tell there is massive interest in government at the moment in deploying cloud infrastructure, and now is the time to be convincing the decision makers that open clouds based on open source are the right way to go. OpenStack has a lot to offer in the private cloud space, and we need to as a community make sure that people are aware of the various options that are out there. This is why there is a shared panel at the end of the day with the OpenStack miniconf.

Wednesday

    There aren’t any OpenStack talks on Wednesday, but I am really hoping that someone will propose an OpenStack BoF via the wiki. I’d sure go to a BoF.

Thursday

  • Playing with OpenStack Swift by John Dickinson
  • Ceph: Managing A Distributed Storage System At Scale by Sage Weil

Friday

  • Openstack on Openstack – a single management API for all your servers by Robert Collins
  • Heat: Orchestrating multiple cloud applications on OpenStack using templates by Angus Salkeld and Steve Baker
  • How OpenStack Improves Code Quality with Project Gating and Zuul by James Blair
  • Ceph: object storage, block storage, file system, replication, massive scalability, and then some! by Tim Serong and Florian Haas

So, if you’re interested in OpenStack and haven’t considered linux.conf.au 2013 as a conference you might be interested in, now would be a good time to reconsider before we sell out!

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On conference t-shirts

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Conference t-shirts can’t be that hard, right? I certainly don’t remember them being difficult when Canberra last hosted linux.conf.au in 2005. I was the person who arranged all the swag for that conference, so I should remember. Yet here I am having spent hours on the phone with vendors, and surrounded with discarded sample t-shirts, size charts and colour swatches. What changed?

The difference between now and then is that in the intervening seven years the Australian Linux community has started to make real effort to be more inclusive. We have anti-harassment policies, we encourage new speakers, and we’re making real efforts to encourage more women into the community.

linux.conf.au 2013 is making real efforts to be as inclusive as possible — one of the first roles we allocated was a diversity officer, who is someone active in the geek feminism community. We’ve had serious discussions about how we can make our event as friendly to all groups as possible, and have some interesting things along those lines to announce soon. We’re working hard to make the conference a safe environment for everyone, and will have independent delegate advocates available at all social events, as well as during the conference.

What I want to specifically talk about here is the conference t-shirts though. We started out with the following criteria — we wanted to provide a men’s cut, and a separate women’s cut, because we recognize that unisex t-shirts are not a good solution for most women. We also need a wider than usual size range in those shirts because we have a diverse set of delegates attending our event. We also didn’t really want to do black, dark blue, or white shirts — mostly because those colours are overdone, but also because the conference is in January when the mean temperature is around 30 degrees Celsius.

Surprisingly, those criteria eliminate the two largest vendors of t-shirts in Australia. Neither Hanes nor Gildan make any t-shirt that has both men’s and women’s cuts, in interesting colours and with a large size variety. So we went on the hunt for other manufacturers. However, I’m jumping a little ahead of myself here, so bear with me.

First off we picked a Hanes shirt because we liked the look of it. We were comfortable with that choice for quite a while before we discovered that the range of colours available in both the men’s and women’s cut was quite small. Sure, there are heaps of colours in each cut, but the overlapping set of colours is much smaller than it first appears. At this point we knew we needed to find a new vendor.

The next most obvious choice is Gildan. Gildan does some really nice shirts, and I immediately fell in love with a colour called “charcoal”. However, once bitten twice shy, so we ordered some sample t-shirts for my wife and I to try out. I’m glad we did this, because the women’s cut was a disaster. First off it didn’t fit my wife very well in the size she normally wears, which it turns out is because the lighter cotton style of t-shirt is 10 centimeters smaller horizontally than the thicker cotton version! It got even worse when we washed the shirts and tried them again — the shirt shrunk significantly on first wash. We also noticed something else which had escaped our attention — the absolute largest size that Gildan did in our chosen style for women was a XXL. Given the sizing ran small, that probably made the largest actual size we could provide a mere XL. That’s not good enough.

Gildan was clearly not going to work for us. I got back on the phone with the supplier who was helping us out and we spent about an hour talking over our requirements and the problems we were seeing with the samples. We even discussed getting a run of custom shirts made overseas and shipped in, but the timing wouldn’t work out. They promised to go away and see what other vendors they could find in this space. Luckily for us they came back with a vendor called BizCollection, who do soft cotton shirts in the charcoal colour I like.

So next we ordered samples of this shirt. It looked good initially — my shirt fit well, as did my wife’s. However, we’d now learnt that testing the shirts through a few wash cycles was useful. So then my wife and I wore the shirts as much as we could for a week, washing them each evening and abusing them in all the ways we could think of — using the dryer, hanging them outside in the sun, pretty much everything apart from jumping up and down on them. I have to say these shirts have held up well, and we’re very happy with them.

The next step is I’m going to go back and order a bunch more sample shirts and make my team wear them. The goal here is to try and validate the size charts that the vendor provides and make sure that we can provide as much advice about fit as possible to delegates. Also, I love a free t-shirt.

After all this we still recognize that some people will never be happy with the conference’s t-shirt. Perhaps they hate the colour or the design, or perhaps they’re very tall and every t-shirt is too short for them. So the final thing we’re doing is we’re giving delegates a choice — they can select between a t-shirt, a branded cap, or a reusable coffee cup. In this way we don’t force delegates to receive something they don’t really want and are unlikely to use.

When you register for the conference, please try to remember that we’ve put a lot of effort as an organizing team into being as detail oriented as possible with all the little things we think delegates care about. I’m sure we’ve made some mistakes, but we are volunteers after all who are doing our best. If you do see something you think can be improved I’d ask that you come and speak to us privately first and give us a chance to make it right before you complain in public.

Thanks for reading my rant about conference t-shirts.

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Got Something to Say? The LCA 2013 CFP Opens Soon!

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The call for presentations opens on 1 June, which is only 11 days away! So if you’re thinking of speaking at the conference (a presentation, tutorial, or miniconference), now would be a good time to start thinking about what you’re going to say. While you’re thinking, please spare a thought for our web team, who are bringing up the entire zookeepr instance so that the CFP will work properly.

We’ve been getting heaps of stuff done over the past few months. We’ve had a “ghosts” meeting (a meeting with former LCA directors), found conference and social venues, and are gearing up for the Call For Presentations.

We’ve signed a contract for the keynote venue, which I think you will all really enjoy. We have also locked in our booking for the lecture theatres, which is now working its way through the ANU process. For social events, we’ve got a great venue for the penguin dinner, and have shortlisted venues for the speakers’ dinner and the professional delegates’ networking session. We’re taking a bit of extra time here because we want venues that are special, and not just the ones which first came to mind.

The ghosts meeting went really well and I think we learnt some important things. The LCA 2013 team is a bit unusual, because so many of us have been on a LCA core team before, but that gave us a chance to dig into things which deserved more attention and skip over the things which are self-evident. We want to take the opportunity in 2013 to have the most accessible, diverse and technically deep conference that we possibly can, and there was a lot of discussion around those issues. We’ve also had it drummed into us that communications with delegates is vitally important and you should expect our attempts to communicate to ramp up as the conference approaches.

I’m really excited about the progress we’ve made so far, and I feel like we’re in a really good state right now. As always, please feel free to contact the LCA2013 team at contact@lca2013.linux.org.au if you have any questions.

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Call for papers opens soon

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It’s time to start thinking about your talk proposals, because the call for papers is only eight weeks away!

For the 2013 conference, the papers committee are going to be focusing on deep technical content, and things we think are going to really matter in the future — that might range from freedom and privacy, to open source cloud systems, or energy efficient server farms of the future. However, the conference is to a large extent what the speakers make it — if we receive many excellent submissions on a topic, then its sure to be represented at the conference.

The papers committee will be headed by the able combination of Michael Davies and Mary Gardiner, who have done an excellent job in previous years. They’re currently working through the details of the call for papers announcement. I am telling you this now because I want speakers to have plenty of time to prepare for the submissions process, as I think that will produce the highest quality of submissions.

I also wanted to let you know the organising for linux.conf.au 2013 is progressing well. We’re currently in the process of locking in all of our venue arrangements, so we will have some announcements about that soon. We’ve received our first venue contract to sign, which is for the keynote venue. It’s exciting, but at the same time a good reminder that the conference is a big responsibility.

What would you like to see at the conference? I am sure there are things which are topical which I haven’t thought of. Blog or tweet your thoughts (include the hashtag #lca2013 please), or email us at contact@lca2013.linux.org.au.

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It seems stickers are a gas

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It seems that stickers are a gas — they expand to occupy available space. We thought we’d ordered heaps of extra stickers to promote LCA 2013, but now we find ourselves running low. That’s not a huge problem, but I do wonder if they are getting used or are just in the bottom of people’s sock drawers. So here’s the plan — if you’ve got a LCA 2013 sticker and have stuck it somewhere, why not tweet a picture of it with the #lca2013 hashtag? If you don’t use twitter, blog it or whatever and let us know at contact@lca2013.linux.org.au. The best picture will get a prize. I don’t know what yet, because I just totally made this up. Perhaps a t-shirt. Perhaps a pet goat.

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