The linux.conf.au 2016 Call For Proposals is open!

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The OpenStack community has been well represented at linux.conf.au over the last few years, which I think is reflective of both the growing level of interest in OpenStack in the general Linux community, as well as the fact that OpenStack is one of the largest Python projects around these days. linux.conf.au is one of the region’s biggest Open Source conferences, and has a solid reputation for deep technical content.

Its time to make it all happen again, with the linux.conf.au 2016 Call For Proposals opening today! I’m especially keen to encourage talk proposals which are somehow more than introductions to various components of OpenStack. Its time to talk detail about how people’s networking deployments work, what container solutions we’re using, and how we’re deploying OpenStack in the real world to do seriously cool stuff.

The conference is in the first week of February in Geelong, Australia. I’d be happy to chat with anyone who has questions about the CFP process.

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OpenStack at linux.conf.au 2013

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As some of you might know, I’m the Director for linux.conf.au 2013. I’ve tried really hard to not use my powers for evil and make the entire conference about OpenStack — in fact I haven’t pulled rank and demanded that specific content be included at all. However, the level of interest in OpenStack has grown so much since LCA 2012 that there is now a significant amount of OpenStack content in the conference without me having to do any of that.

I thought I’d take a second to highlight some of the OpenStack content that I think is particularly interesting — these are the talks I’ll be going to if I have the time (which remains to be seen):

Monday

  • Cloud Infrastructure, Distributed Storage and High Availability Miniconf: while not specifically about OpenStack, this miniconf is going to be a good warm up for all things IaaS at the conference. Here’s a list of the talks for that miniconf:
      Delivering IaaS with Apache CloudStack – Joe Brockmeier

    • oVirt – Dan Macpherson
    • Aeolus – Dan Macpherson
    • Ops: From bare metal to cloud space – Phil Ingram
    • VMs on VLANs on Bridges on Bonds on many NICs – Kim Hawtin
    • OpenStack Swift Overview – John Dickinson
    • JORN and the rise and fall of clustering – Jamie Birse
    • MongoDB Replication & Replica Sets – Stephen Steneker
    • MariaDB Galera Cluster – Grant Allen
    • The Grand Distributed Storage Debate: GlusterFS and Ceph going head to head – Florian Haas, Sage Weil, Jeff Darcy

Tuesday

  • The OpenStack Miniconf: this is a mostly-clear winner for Tuesday. Tristan Goode has been doing a fantastic job of organizing this miniconf, which might not be obvious to people who haven’t been talking to him a couple of times a week about its progress like me. I think people will be impressed with the program, which includes:
    • Welcome and Introduction – Tristan Goode
    • Introduction to OpenStack – Joshua McKenty
    • Demonstration – Sina Sadeghi
    • NeCTAR Research Cloud: OpenStack in Production – Tom Fifeld
    • Bare metal provisioning with OpenStack – Devananda van der Veen
    • Intro to Swift for New Contributors – John Dickinson
    • All-around OpenStack storage with Ceph – Florian Haas
    • Writing API extensions for Nova – Christopher Yeoh
    • The OpenStack Metering Project – Angus Salkeld
    • Lightweight PaaS on the NCI OpenStack Cloud – Kevin Pulo
    • Enabling Compute Clusters atop OpenStack – Enis Afgan
    • Shared Panel with Open Government
  • The Open Government Miniconf: this is the other OpenStack relevant miniconf on Tuesday. This might seem like a bit of a stretch, but as best as I can tell there is massive interest in government at the moment in deploying cloud infrastructure, and now is the time to be convincing the decision makers that open clouds based on open source are the right way to go. OpenStack has a lot to offer in the private cloud space, and we need to as a community make sure that people are aware of the various options that are out there. This is why there is a shared panel at the end of the day with the OpenStack miniconf.

Wednesday

    There aren’t any OpenStack talks on Wednesday, but I am really hoping that someone will propose an OpenStack BoF via the wiki. I’d sure go to a BoF.

Thursday

  • Playing with OpenStack Swift by John Dickinson
  • Ceph: Managing A Distributed Storage System At Scale by Sage Weil

Friday

  • Openstack on Openstack – a single management API for all your servers by Robert Collins
  • Heat: Orchestrating multiple cloud applications on OpenStack using templates by Angus Salkeld and Steve Baker
  • How OpenStack Improves Code Quality with Project Gating and Zuul by James Blair
  • Ceph: object storage, block storage, file system, replication, massive scalability, and then some! by Tim Serong and Florian Haas

So, if you’re interested in OpenStack and haven’t considered linux.conf.au 2013 as a conference you might be interested in, now would be a good time to reconsider before we sell out!

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Long time not much write

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I haven’t written much in the last couple of months, but I have good excuses. Mainly, its a combination of joining a new team at work (its cool, but I’d have to kill you), playing with some cool toys, developing a new personal obsession, Andrew starting school, and not having much to say.

To make up for this, I give you a picture of me bowling last Friday:

I’ll also give you a sneak peek at that new personal obsession:

“There is little data on the relative popularity of the various
available SMTP server implementations. This data is of
interest because it aids the development of systems which
interact with these servers. For example, a potential DDoS
protection system should be tested with the most common
SMTP servers, as these are the ones that it is most likely to
encounter in everyday use.

This poster will describe our efforts to measure the deployment of SMTP servers on the Internet, using a combination
of passive observation of email traffic, as well as active probing of SMTP servers. A description of the methodology is
provided, as well as early results.”

That’s part of my poster proposal for LISA 2007 which I will be attending.

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MySQL Users Conference

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Well, they’re definitely thinking about getting started. Like last year I caught the VTA down — it’s hard to beat a $1.75 trip without having to worry about traffic. Registraton wasn’t as smooth this year as last, for example I didn’t get my free book (there didn’t seem to be any attempt to hand those out to speakers). Whatever.

I’m now waiting for the replication talk to start.

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Managing MySQL the Slack Way: How Google Deploys New MySQL Servers

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I’ll be presenting about Slack (the open sourced tool kit we use for deployment software configuration) at the MySQL user’s conference in Santa Clara in late April. The talk will focus on the interesting aspects of Slack as it relates to MySQL and should be fun. A DBA mate of mine is gonna present with me, so it should be a barrel of laughs.
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