My candidacy for Kilo Compute PTL

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This is mostly historical at this point, but I forgot to post it here when I emailed it a week or so ago. So, for future reference:

I'd like another term as Compute PTL, if you'll have me.

We live in interesting times. openstack has clearly gained a large
amount of mind share in the open cloud marketplace, with Nova being a
very commonly deployed component. Yet, we don't have a fantastic
container solution, which is our biggest feature gap at this point.
Worse -- we have a code base with a huge number of bugs filed against
it, an unreliable gate because of subtle bugs in our code and
interactions with other openstack code, and have a continued need to
add features to stay relevant. These are hard problems to solve.

Interestingly, I think the solution to these problems calls for a
social approach, much like I argued for in my Juno PTL candidacy
email. The problems we face aren't purely technical -- we need to work
out how to pay down our technical debt without blocking all new
features. We also need to ask for understanding and patience from
those feature authors as we try and improve the foundation they are
building on.

The specifications process we used in Juno helped with these problems,
but one of the things we've learned from the experiment is that we
don't require specifications for all changes. Let's take an approach
where trivial changes (no API changes, only one review to implement)
don't require a specification. There will of course sometimes be
variations on that rule if we discover something, but it means that
many micro-features will be unblocked.

In terms of technical debt, I don't personally believe that pulling
all hypervisor drivers out of Nova fixes the problems we face, it just
moves the technical debt to a different repository. However, we
clearly need to discuss the way forward at the summit, and come up
with some sort of plan. If we do something like this, then I am not
sure that the hypervisor driver interface is the right place to do
that work -- I'd rather see something closer to the hypervisor itself
so that the Nova business logic stays with Nova.

Kilo is also the release where we need to get the v2.1 API work done
now that we finally have a shared vision for how to progress. It took
us a long time to get to a good shared vision there, so we need to
ensure that we see that work through to the end.

We live in interesting times, but they're also exciting as well.

I have since been elected unopposed, so thanks for that!

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The Decline and Fall of IBM: End of an American Icon?

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This book is quite readable, which surprises me for the relatively dry topic. Whilst obviously not everyone will agree with the author’s thesis, it is clear that IBM hasn’t been managed for long term success in a long time and there are a lot of very unhappy employees. The book is an interesting perspective on a complicated problem.

The Decline and Fall of IBM Book Cover The Decline and Fall of IBM
Robert X. Cringely
Computer industry
Nerdtv, LLC
June 10, 2014
202

IBM is in serious trouble. Big Blue, as the company is known, tends to rely for its success on magical thinking but that magic ran out a long time ago. The company got in trouble back in the 1990s and had to hire for the first time an outside CEO, Lou Gerstner, to save the day. Gerstner pushed IBM into services with spectacular results but this hurt the company, too. As services have became commoditized IBM could only compete by offshoring the work and quality suffered. The other negative impact of Gerstner was his compensation which was for the first time in IBM history very high. Only the Watson family had become rich running IBM with later CEOs like John Opel and John Akers living comfortable lives with lots of perks, but they never got BIG RICH. That changed with Gerstner. Sam Palmisano an IBM lifer followed Gerstner as CEO and followed, too, the Gerstner playbook. Palmisano retired three years ago with a retirement package worth $241 million, replaced by IBM's first woman CEO, Ginni Rometty, who certainly expects a comparable golden parachute. In order to achieve these numbers, though, IBM has essentially sacrificed both its customers and employees. In order to have ever growing earnings per share the company has cut labor to the bone, off-shored everything it can, dropped quality, deliberately underbid contracts to win them then not performed. IBM's acquisition policy is one of buying companies to get their sales then cutting costs to the bone and under-delivering. This and share buybacks have kept earnings growing until this house of cards recently began to fall. Ginni Rometty, who will end up taking the fall for Palmisano's flawed strategy, has stated a very specific earnings goal for 2015 that she will destroy the company to achieve if she must. This book how IBM fell from grace, where it is headed, and what specifically can be done to save the company before it is too late.

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